The Price of Parliament

Published: Mon, 09/24/2012 - 12:19

Top-heavy, over-paid and underworked, members of Pakistan’s Parliament are, at best, little more than a drain on the economy
Noorilhuda Karachi

Mohsin Leghari is excited. Not only did he beat the odds to become a senator as an independent candidate, he proved a point. “This was my crusade against the division of seats on a party-basis. They collaborate with each other on seats,” he says sitting in an office in Islamabad. “I was an MPA for nine years – in 2002 from the Millat Party, in 2008 from the Q-League. I saw that MPAs did not even know the process of how to elect a senator. That is not democracy! I made friends in the Punjab Assembly. They witnessed my track record on education and water issues and saw my credibility.”

The plump 49-year-old does not look his age. Born to the Leghari clan, one of the larger tribes settled in Dera Ghazi Khan for 300 years, his family is full of politicians, former ministers and even one (dead) president of Pakistan. Two cousins and one uncle are serving MNAs. However, for many years Mohsin Leghari opted for the road less travelled. He studied electrical engineering in the US, earned a diploma in applied economics from Australia, and for a while was associated with Reuters Pakistan. In between Leghari got married and had three children. Then his father told him to join politics and he obliged.

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By arrangement with Newsline, Pakistan

Top-heavy, over-paid and underworked, members of Pakistan’s Parliament are, at best, little more than a drain on the economy
Noorilhuda Karachi

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