Obituary: The unknown who defined Lucknow's lost generation bows out

Saeed Naqvi

The mail from Lucknow was terse. 
“Mr. Ibne Hasan Advocate is no more.” He was “Ibne Hasan bhai” to me ever since he cast me as the young Daagh Dehlvi in 1954 in “Dehli Ki Aakhri Shama” (Flicker of the last lamp in Delhi) a Tamseeli Mushaira, enactment of the last poetic gathering in the Red Fort in 1857. Ghalib, Zauq, Momin, Daagh and other great contemporaries participated in this historic soiree.) 
The show was staged at the University Union Hall where Ibne, as master of ceremonies, announced a hundred awards for the young Daagh. 

Nagar best embodies Lucknawi ‘pehle aap’ culture

To better understand what makes Lucknow unique and its citizens so special read Amritlal Nagar. The birth anniversary celebration of one of the city’s most charming chroniclers is a golden opportunity to rediscover Nagar’s writings inspired by life in Lucknow.

The Hindi author’s work has a cinematic quality that leaves a lasting impression in the mind of the reader of a time when citizens belonging to various communities and practising different faiths had more in common with one another than is now remembered and even less practised.

The Indian Subcontinent’s First Melting Pot

Lucknow has always been a smart city.  Even though somewhere along the way the city lost its sheen and was reduced to a shameful shabbiness, the latest figures released by the Union Tourism Ministry reveal that visitors still love Lucknow.

Last year, Uttar Pradesh, of which Lucknow is the capital, received 2.91 million visitors, which is higher than Delhi’s 2.32 million. It’s safe to assume that a majority of visitors to UP went to the state in order to see Lucknow.