China

In a historic first. two Karmapa Lamas meet in Paris and promise to work together

The two Karmapa Lamas, competing heads of Tibetan Buddism's oldest and biggest sect, Karma Kagyu, , Ogyen Trinley Dorje  and Trinley Thaye Dorje met over the last few days in Paris. Besides knowing each other, they resolved to work together to promote the Karma Kagyu sect. What is not clear is who organised the meeting and its implications on Tibetan Buddhism in a post-Dalai Lama world. 

In a historic first, two Karmapa Lamas meet in Paris and promise to work together

The two Karmapa Lamas, competing heads of Tibetan Buddism's oldest and biggest sect, Karma Kagyu, , Ogyen Trinley Dorje  and Trinley Thaye Dorje met over the last few days in Paris. Besides knowing each other, they resolved to work together to promote the Karma Kagyu sect. What is not clear is who organised the meeting and its implications on Tibetan Buddhism in a post-Dalai Lama world. 

What should India do?

In the past few months there have been ample indications that New Delhi is keen to restore its broken ties with China. It has realised to its mortification that post the Doklam face-off, India has not really benefited from the confrontation save for getting some applause for showing spine in the face of Chinese expansion. It has found its influence in South Asia getting compromised by a determined Chinese onslaught.